“Troubling Texts in the Bible” — a new sermon series beginning Aug. 2


Abraham and Isaac

Genesis 22:1-18 — “A Call for Child Sacrifice?”
Aug. 2

Deuteronomy 20:10-18 — “A Call for Genocide?”
Aug. 9

Colossians 3:22 — “A Call for Slavery?”
Aug. 16

1 Timothy 2:12 — “A Call for Patriarchy?”
Aug. 30

And coming soon…
The Difficult Sayings of Jesus

“A Call to Arms?” — Matthew 10:34

“A Call to Turn Against One’s Family?” — Matthew 10:35-37

“A Call for Perpetual Poverty?” — Mark 14:7

“A Call for Eternal Torture?” — Luke 16:19-31

New sermon series: “Help! My family & friends think I’m going to hell!”

jonstewart

“Help! My family and friends think I’m going to hell!”
(or, “How to Survive Get Togethers with Family and Friends — even if you don’t share the same religious beliefs”)

Rev. Dr. Phil Snider

Part 1 – July 5
Part 2 – July 12

Although the title of Phil’s new sermon series is a bit tongue-in-cheek, its content is not. One of the challenges we increasingly face — especially in the midst of so much religious and political polarization, which feels all the more prominent after the Supreme Court’s ruling last week on marriage equality — is the difficulty of navigating the close relationships we have with those who hold different religious beliefs than our own. After all, our religious beliefs often represent what we believe to be most ultimate, and we hold them very close to our hearts (this is true for both “conservatives” and “liberals”). At the same time, our relationships are incredibly important to us as well, and vital to our well-being. Yet when the beliefs we hold closest to our hearts feel under attack by those we hold dear (or, perhaps, we don’t affirm the beliefs that we’re told we’re supposed to affirm) — and we’re led to believe we’re lost or even eternally damned — it’s as if two worlds collide, and the end result can make us feel not only defensive and frustrated, but also angry and bitter. Which isn’t good for anybody.

Given these differences, this two-part sermon series explores some of the following questions:

  • How do we overcome these complexities in a healthy, constructive way for all parties involved? Is it possible?
  • How do people who hold very different beliefs share in meaningful, life-giving relationships with one another?
  • How can religion bring us together, as opposed to drive us apart?
  • Why are religion and politics, the two things we aren’t supposed to talk about in public, so divisive?
  • And perhaps most importantly, what resources might we find in the Christian tradition that can help us move forward in helpful ways?

We hope you can join us!

eRacism: understanding and dismantling racism

arpr
Fri, Jul 10, 2015 4:00pm – Sat, Jul 11, 2015 4:00pm
Columbia College Dulany Hall
1001 Rogers St Columbia, MO, 65201

We’re excited to invite you to an excellent educational experience close to home! This workshop will help you understand of many of the issues of racism that affect all of us and give you tools to begin making a difference in your congregation and community. The event will be led by our Christian Church of Mid-America Pro-Reconciliation/Anti-Racism Team.

Cost: $65 (includes lodging and meals)
$40 (meals only)

As one of its top four priorities, Pro-Reconciliation/Anti Racism is intimately tied to the Church’s mission to become a church that demonstrates true community, deep Christian spirituality and a passion for justice. This initiative seeks to nurture the wholeness of the church by dismantling systemic racism and other oppressive structures.

Schedule

Friday, July 10 Registration 4-6pm; Dinner at 6pm; Session #1 at 7pm
Saturday, July 11 Breakfast at 7:30am; Session #2 at 9am; Lunch at noon; Session #3 at 1pm, Workshop ends at 4pm.

Who Should Attend?

Clergy, youth and children’s ministry staff/volunteers, young adults, church boards, elders, deacons, pastoral search committees.

Online Registration
Printable Registration

Juneteenth + PrideFest Equality March

On Saturday, June 20th, participants from Brentwood and the community are invited to participate in two simultaneous events in downtown Springfield: Juneteenth Celebration and Springfield Equality March/PrideFest. 

Here’s information about each:

JUNETEENTH

The NAACP, Midtown Carnegie Library, the City of Springfield, and the Springfield Greene County Park Board invite the public to celebrate and share in what freedom means to them.  Juneteenth is the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States.
 
Cheryl Clay, President of the Springfield Missouri NAACP, will be issuing a statement about the Charleston murders.  At 1:30, there will also be a moment of silence and a prayer for the victims, their families, and the Emanuel AME Church community.  The Emanuel AME Church is one of oldest and most historically significant churches in the South.
 
 12:00 WELCOME NAACP PRESIDENT—Cheryl Clay        
12:05 GREETINGS MIDTOWN LIBRARY –Ingrid Bohnenkamp & Eva Pelkey
12:15 GREETINGS ZONE 1—Phyllis Ferguson, Councilwoman
12:20 MUSICAL SELECTION—Kyleigh Jackson 
12:15 HISTORY OF JUNETEENTH—Cheryl Clay 
12:25 RECOGNITION OF BOOTHS—Representatives of community organizations
12:30 MUSICAL SELECTION—Solomon Brown
12:35 SPOKEN WORD—Pastor TJ Appleby 
12:45 DANCE GROUP—SOS (Saving Our Sisters) 
12:55 GREETINGS ZONE 3—Mike Schilling Councilperson 
1:00 HISTORY OF JUNETEENTH—Gwen Marshall 
1:10 MUSICAL PERFORMANCE—Jin-J-X Music
1:30 MOMENT OF SILENCE AND PRAY FOR CHARLESTON SHOOTING VICTIMS AND FAMILIES 
1:40 SPRINGFIELD ART MUSEUM—Children’s Activity 
2:00 GREETINGS—Mayor Bob Stephens 
2:10 INTRODUCTION NAACP EXECUTIVE BOARD 
3:45 CLOSING REMARKS & ANNOUNCEMENTS

PRIDEFEST

  

eRacism: understanding and dismantling racism

arpr
Fri, Jul 10, 2015 4:00pm – Sat, Jul 11, 2015 4:00pm
Columbia College Dulany Hall
1001 Rogers St Columbia, MO, 65201

We’re excited to invite you to an excellent educational experience close to home! This workshop will help you understand of many of the issues of racism that affect all of us and give you tools to begin making a difference in your congregation and community. The event will be led by our Christian Church of Mid-America Pro-Reconciliation/Anti-Racism Team.

Cost: $65 (includes lodging and meals)
$40 (meals only)

As one of its top four priorities, Pro-Reconciliation/Anti Racism is intimately tied to the Church’s mission to become a church that demonstrates true community, deep Christian spirituality and a passion for justice. This initiative seeks to nurture the wholeness of the church by dismantling systemic racism and other oppressive structures.

Schedule

Friday, July 10 Registration 4-6pm; Dinner at 6pm; Session #1 at 7pm
Saturday, July 11 Breakfast at 7:30am; Session #2 at 9am; Lunch at noon; Session #3 at 1pm, Workshop ends at 4pm.

Who Should Attend?

Clergy, youth and children’s ministry staff/volunteers, young adults, church boards, elders, deacons, pastoral search committees.

Online Registration
Printable Registration

Diaper Drive at Brentwood

2807-DiaperBank-ColorLogo

Brentwood is sponsoring a Diaper Drive during the month of June to benefit the Diaper Bank of the Ozarks. We will be collecting diapers in Size Newborn and Size 1, baby wipes, and gently used, 100% cotton T-shirts that will be recycled into cloth diapers (whites or colors, no holes). You may place your donations in the playpen that is set up in the gathering area outside the sanctuary or in the designated box in the downstairs fellowship hall. Please contact our church office with any questions. Thank you for making a difference in the lives of young parents in our community!

One Combined Worship Service — May 31st at 10:00 a.m.

Worship Schedule for May 31
10:00 a.m. – One Combined Worship Service in the Sanctuary

(We will return to our regular Sunday schedule the next Sunday, June 7, with services at 9:00, 10:00, and 11:00.)

One of the ways we cultivate community at Brentwood Christian Church is by having one combined worship service every time there is a fifth Sunday in a month, as is the case in May. This provides the wonderful opportunity for us to come together and draw on various expressions and styles of worship and music from each of our three usual worship services. After one combined worship service, we share in a potluck meal in the downstairs fellowship hall which provides the opportunity for us to connect with new and old friends alike.

If you plan on worshiping with us on May 31st — which we hope you do :-) — please note that our only worship service will be at 10:00 a.m. We will return to our regular schedule the following Sunday.

As Mother’s Day approaches…

nonmom

Dear Pastor,

Tone can be tricky in writing. Picture me popping my head in your office door, smiling and asking if we could talk for five minutes. I’m sipping on my diet coke as I sit down.

You know that I’m not one to shy away from speaking my mind, part of the reason you love me (mostly!), so I’m guessing that internally you brace yourself wondering what might be next.

I set my can down and this is what I’d say.

A few years ago I sat across from a woman who told me she doesn’t go to church on Mother’s Day because it is too hurtful. I’m not a mother, but I had never seen the day as hurtful. She had been married, had numerous miscarriages, divorced and was beyond child bearing years. It was like salt in mostly healed wounds to go to church on that day. This made me sad, but I understood.

Fast forward several years to Mother’s Day. A pastor asked all mothers to stand. On my immediate right, my mother stood and on my immediate left, a dear friend stood. I, a woman in her late 30s, sat. I don’t know how others saw me, but I felt dehumanized, gutted as a woman. Real women stood, empty shells sat. I do not normally feel this way. I do not like feeling this way. I want no woman to ever feel this way in church again.

Last year a friend from the States happened to visit on Mother’s Day and again the pastor (a different one) asked all mothers to stand. As a mother, she stood and I whispered to her, “I can’t take it, I’m standing.” She knows I’m not a mother yet she understood my standing / lie.

Here’s the thing, I believe we can honor mothers without alienating others. I want women to feel welcome, appreciated, seen, and needed here in our little neck of the body of Christ.

Do away with the standing. You mean well, but it’s just awkward. Does the woman who had a miscarriage stand? Does the mom whose children ran away stand? Does the single woman who is pregnant stand? A.w.k.w.a.r.d.

2. Acknowledge the wide continuum of mothering.

[Head on over to Time-Warp Wife to continue reading…]

Brentwood Christian Church & the Supreme Court Ruling on Marriage

Two hands creating a heart
As those of us around the country await the Supreme Court’s ruling that could potentially legalize same-sex marriage nationwide (same-sex marriage isn’t currently legal in Missouri), the General Board of Brentwood Christian Church, at its meeting on May 4, 2015, officially gave its approval for same-sex weddings to be celebrated in our sanctuary. As an open and affirming congregation, Brentwood has consistently expressed its support for equal rights, and the Board wanted to explicitly state that this includes celebrating same-sex weddings as well, in the same manner that might apply to any other wedding viewed as sacred in the eyes of God.
IMG_1560